Category Archives: Swiss Medals

Swiss 1895 Shooting Medal Cantons St. Gallen Silver Proof RRR Mintage: 800 700 Eu

Switzerland   Shooting Medal Cantons St. Gallen 1895
Grade: Proof
Catalog: Richter. 1168 a
Composition: Silver
Weight: 41.79 gr
Mintage: 800

Rare in this condition

K1 99

 

22 Swiss 1802 Musikschool Medal Cantons Geneva Silver PROOF RRR 350 Eu

Switzerland   Musikschool Medal Cantons Geneva 1802
Grade: Proof
Catalog: Richter. Geb 1587
Composition: Silver
Weight: 28.42 gr


Rare in this condition

K1 73

22 Swiss 1897 Shooting Medal Schaffhausen Silver Prooflike RRR 400 Eu

Swiss 1898 Shooting Medal Schaffhausen
Grade: Prooflike 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 19.78 g
 
Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1767 Medal Cantons Geneva Silver UNC RRR 550 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Switzerland  Medal Cantons Vaud Independence Centennial Woman 1897
Grade: UNC
Composition: Silver
Weight: 44.30 gr
Mintage: —-
medal 1767 on the 24 representatives of the citizenship delegation to settle the struggles between the Council party and the citizens, by Jon Colibert, dm 46 mm. 44.26g

Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1865 Wein Medal Cantons Vaud Vevey Silver Proof RRR Mintage: 872 Price 450 Eu

Switzerland  Wein Medal Cantons Vaud Vevey 1865 RRR
Grade: Proof
Catalog: leu. 431444
Composition: Silver
Weight: 28.37 g
Mintage: 872

Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1806 Medal Bern Academy Silver NGC MS-65 RRR 1200 Eu

Switzerland   Bern Academy Medal Cantons Bern 1806
Grade: MS-65
Composition: Silver
Weight: 37.01 gr


Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1903 Shooting Medal Cantons Appenzell Herisau Silver UNC RRR 550 Eu

Switzerland   Shooting Medal Cantons Appenzell Herisau 1903
Grade: UNC
Catalog: Richter. 70 a
Composition: Silver
Weight: 37.52 gr
Mintage: — — —
K1 43
Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1897 Medal Cantons Vaud Independence Centennial Woman Silver UNC RRR 250 Eu

Switzerland  Medal Cantons Vaud Independence Centennial Woman 1897
Grade: UNC
Composition: Silver
Weight: 23.95 gr
Mintage:
K1 81
Rare in this condition

Swiss 1889 Shooting Medal Cantons Ticino Silver UNC R#1400b RRR Mintage: 350 Price 950 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss 1889 Shooting Medal Cantons Ticino
Grade: UNC 
Catalog: Richter#1400b ( RRR )
Composition: Silver
Weight: 44.32 gr
Mintage: only 350
 
Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1887 Shooting Medal Cantons Geneva Prooflike R#628 RRR 400 Eu

Switzerland  Shooting Medal Cantons Geneva 1887 
Grade: Prooflike 
Catalog: Richter#628
Composition: Silver
Weight: 38.62 g
K1 74
 
Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1903 Medal Cantons Appenzeil Silver RRR UNC Mintage: 248 Price: 800 Eu

Swiss 1903  Medal Cantons Appenzeil 500 anniversary of the Battle of Vögelinsegg.
Grade: UNC 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 32.82 g
Mintage: 248
 
Rare in this condition

Shooting Medal Cantons Neuchatel La Chaux de Fonds 1886 Switzerland UNC R#951a R 500 Eu

Shooting Medal Cantons Neuchatel La Chaux de Fonds 1886 Switzerland
Grade: UNC 
Catalog: Richter#951a ( R )
Composition: Silver
Weight: 36.00 gr
Mintage: 1250
 
Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1892 Silver Shooting Medal Glarus R#808b M#432 Mintage : 3375 Prooflike 450 Eu

Swiss 1892 Silver Shooting Medal Glarus Helvetia
Grade: Prooflike 
Catalog: Richter#808b M#432
Composition: Silver
Weight: 38.93 gr
Mintage: 3 375
 
Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1890 Shooting Medal Cantons Thurgau-Frauenfeld Silver R-1250b R 300 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss 1890 Shooting Medal Cantons Thurgau Frauenfeld 

Grade: Prooflike 
Catalog: Richter#1250b
Composition: Silver
Weight: 38.92 g
Mintage: 5760

22 Swiss 1892 Silver Shooting Medal Glarus R#808b M#432 Helvetia Mintage : 3375 Price: 450 Eu

Swiss 1892 Silver Shooting Medal Glarus Helvetia
Grade: Prooflike 
Catalog: Richter#808b M#432
Composition: Silver
Weight: 38.97 gr
Mintage: 3 375
 
Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1890 Shooting Medal Cantons Thurgau Silver R-1250b RRR Mintage: 5760 Price: 300 Eu

Swiss 1890 Shooting Medal Cantons Thurgau Frauenfeld 
Grade: Prooflike 
Catalog: Richter#1250b
Composition: Silver
Weight: 38.55 g
Mintage: 5760

22 Swiss 1898 Shooting Medal Cantons Neuchatel Silver UNC R-970c RRR Mintage: 4250 Price: 200 Eu

Swiss 1898 Shooting Medal Cantons Neuchatel 
Grade: UNC 
Catalog: Richter#970c
Composition: Silver
Weight: 38.10 g
Mintage: 4250
 K1 100
Rare in this condition

Swiss 1901 Shooting Medal Cantons Luzern Silver UNC R-879b RRR Mintage: 7000 Price: 200 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss 1901 Shooting Medal Cantons Luzern 
Grade: UNC 
Catalog: Richter#879b
Composition: Silver
Weight: 35.13 gr
Mintage: 7000
 
Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1892 Silver Shooting Medal Glarus R#808b M#432 Helvetia Mintage : 3375 Price: 450 Eu

Swiss 1892 Silver Shooting Medal Glarus Helvetia
Grade: Prooflike 
Catalog: Richter#808b M#432
Composition: Silver
Weight: 38.62 gr
Mintage: 3 375
 K1 91
Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1892 Shooting Medal Cantons Neuchatel Le Locle Silver Prooflike RRR 550 Eu

Switzerland   Shooting Medal Cantons Neuchatel Le Locle 1892 
Grade: Prooflike 
Catalog: Richter#959 b
Composition: Silver
Weight: 39.12 gr
Mintage: 705
 K1 103
Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1889 Shooting Medal Cantons Luzern Silver XF Richter#867a 300 Eu

Swiss 1889 Shooting Medal Cantons Luzern
Grade: XF 
Catalog: Richter#867a
Composition: Silver
Weight: 38.69 gr
K1 44

22 Swiss 1892 Shooting Medal Cantons Neuchatel Le Locle Silver Prooflike RRR 600 Eu

Switzerland   Shooting Medal Cantons Neuchatel Le Locle 1892 
Grade: Prooflike 
Catalog: Richter#959 b
Composition: Silver
Weight: 39.07 gr
Mintage: 705
 K1 93
Rare in this condition

Swiss 1894 Shooting Medal Cantons Luzern Silver UNC R-877a RRR Mintage: 800 Price: 700 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss 1894 Shooting Medal Cantons Luzern 
Grade: UNC 
Catalog: Richter#877a
Composition: Silver
Weight: 39.51 gr
Mintage: 800
 
Rare in this condition

22 Swiss 1899 Shooting Medal Cantons Aargau Wohlen Silver UNC RRR Mintage: 529 Price: 650 Eu

Switzerland   Shooting Medal Cantons Aargau Wohlen 1899 
Grade: UNC 
Catalog: Richter#25 a 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 38.07 gr
Mintage: 529
 K1 92
Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : CORIOLAN A.R. 266 XF RRR 400 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : CORIOLAN A.R. 266

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.57 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : PRISE DE SAGONTE A.R. 534 XF RRR 400 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : PRISE DE SAGONTE A.R. 534

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.69 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : AVAPISE PUNIE A.R. 700 XF RRR 400 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : AVAPISE PUNIE A.R. 700

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.67 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : ROMULUS A.R. 1 XF RRR 400 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : ROMULUS A.R. 1

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 10
.00 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : ALBE SOUMISE A ROME A.R. 89 XF RRR 400 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : ALBE SOUMISE A ROME A.R. 89

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 10
.00 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : SECOURS DUN ALLIE FIDELLE A.R. 489 XF RRR 400 Eu

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : SECOURS DUN ALLIE FIDELLE A.R. 489

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 10
.02 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : ZELE DES FABIENS A.R. 275 XF RRR 400 Eu

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : ZELE DES FABIENS A.R. 275

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.53 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : CATON DUTIQUE A.R. 708 XF RRR 400 Eu

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : CATON DUTIQUE A.R. 708

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.57 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : MAIESTE DU SENAT A.R. 472 XF RRR 400 Eu

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : MAIESTE DU SENAT A.R. 472

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 10
.07 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : QUINTIUS FLAMINTUS A.R. 556 XF RRR 400 Eu

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : QUINTIUS FLAMINTUS A.R. 556

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.79 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : SACESSE DU SENAT A.R. 538 XF RRR 400 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : SACESSE DU SENAT A.R. 538

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.87 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : CONSTANCE DE SCEVOLA A.R. 246 XF RRR 400 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : CONSTANCE DE SCEVOLA A.R. 246

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 10
.02 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

 

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : SCIPION ET LELIUS A.R. 584 XF RRR 400 Eu

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : SCIPION ET LELIUS A.R. 584

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.87 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
 
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : GENEROSITE DES DAMES ROMAINES A.R. 360 XF RRR 400 Eu

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER :GENEROSITE DES DAMES ROMAINES A.R. 360

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.93 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
 
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER :TUGURTHA PUNI A.R. 647 XF RRR 400 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER :TUGURTHA PUNI A.R. 647

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.99 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
 
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER :MANLIUS FAIT MOURIR SON FILS XF RRR 400 Eu

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER :MANLIUS FAIT MOURIR SON FILS 

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.93 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
 
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : P CORNEL SCIPION LAFRIQUAIN XF RRR 400 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : P CORNEL SCIPION LAFRIQUAIN

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.70 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
 
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : CATON LE GENSEUR XF RRR 400 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : CATON LE GENSEUR 

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.47 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
 
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : NUMA POMPILIUS XF RRR 400 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : NUMA POMPILIUS

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.72 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
 
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : REGULUS XF RRR 400 Eu

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : Regulus

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 9
.79 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
 
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition

22 Swiss Medal 1720 medal Genf DASSIER : VICTOIRES DE ANNIBAL XF RRR 400 Eu ПРОДАН

ПРОДАН

Swiss  Medal 1720 medal Genf  DASSIER : VICTOIRES DE ANNIBAL

Grade: XF 
Composition: Silver
Weight: 10
.12 gr

 
Jean Dassier, born August 17 or October 17, 1676 in Geneva and died in the same city on November 12, 1763, is a Geneva medalist.
 
Originally from Lyon, the Dassier family fled to Geneva to St. Bartholomew. Jean Dassier is the son of Domaine Dassier (1640-1719), named engraver of the Mint of the Republic of Geneva, and Sara Le Grand. The couple will have six children, including Paul (1681-1768), also a medalist.
In 1703, Jean Dassier married Anne Prévost-Gaudy, of whom he had two sons also mediators, Jacques-Antoine (1715-1759), and Antoine (1718-1780), who would engrave very little. Antoine is the father of Pierre Dassier, general in the service of France and the ancestor of Gustave Ador, president of the Swiss Confederation in 1919-1920.
The Dassiers were the only medalists of their century cited in the Encyclopedia of Diderot and Alembert.
Career [edit | change the code]
After studying in Paris with Jean Mauger and Jean Roëttiers, Jean Dassier becomes the assistant of his father.
In 1712 he was admitted as a master to the goldsmiths’ corporation with his brother Paul. In 1720, Jean Dassier succeeded his father as engraver of the Republic. He successively engraves:
in 1711: Ovid’s Metamorphoses (60 medals) with French Jerome Roussel;
in 1723: The illustrious men of the century of Louis XIV;
in 1725-1728: The Reformers of the Church.
After two trips to London in 1728 and again in 1731, he wrote two series: The Kings of England and The Famous Britons.
The History series of the Roman Republic (1740-1743) is certainly the most sought after and gave rise to a book in 1778 giving the explanation.
In 1738 he was appointed to the Council of Two Hundred. Jean Dassier knew Jean-Jacques Rousseau very well (1712-1778), being like him a citizen of Geneva.
In 1753, he obtained from Montesquieu to engrave a medal with the mention Hinc Jura1.
At his death, his son Jacques-Antoine takes his place as engraver at the Monnaie de Genève. The company Dassier et fils continues to produce watch cases but no longer earns medals.



Rare in this condition